2018 Chronicle Cabernet Sauvignon, Rebel Wine

The attributes of this wine line right up to the preferences of this oenophile. The 2018 Chronicle is produced on California’s North Coast, it’s a blend of Cabernet Sauvignon (88%) and Petite Sirah (12%), and has an intriguing label that just may include an individually numbered bottle. Let’s dig deeper…

Generally, the North Coast includes Mendocino, Lake, Sonoma, Napa, Solano, and Marin counties. St. Helena is just west of the Mayacamas Mountains, located in the Napa Valley AVA, and is home to many of California’s best-known wines. The Valley itself extends about 30 miles from Napa at the south to Calistoga in the north, right along Route 29 and including St. Helena.

Fog in the region impacts its vineyards in meaningful and very specific ways. The complexities of cool and warm climates, sunlight, ocean airs, and earthquakes makes for diverse appellations and even subappellations conducive to different types of grapes (e.g., Pinot Noir and Cabernet Sauvignon), even among neighboring growers and towns. It’s a place that beckons to my soul even while I’m jotting a few notes for you all here.

2018 Chronicle Cabernet Sauvignon, Rebel Wine, St. Helena, California, USA.

The 2018 Chronicle is a medium- to full-bodied dry red blend, with dark fruit notes that I’m calling more blackberry or black cherry than plum. Sometimes my palate can pick that up; other times it’s less clear so use your own judgment here. I do smell a bit of leather in my glass, and the peppery finish is suggestive of both the Cab and Sirah grapes for the wine.

We had the Chronicle with Julia Child’s Beef Bourguignon, served with mashed potatoes and green beans. It was flat-out great, with tenderly seared beef and vegetables so tender…wow! Those who follow Notes regularly know the meal is often less relevant to this taster than is the accompanying wine, but this is not one of those occasions. The dish was so rich and savory that I really thought less of the Chronicle and more of the food flavors. Understand me: the wine is tasty but the stew even better.

The label (but less easy to support with online research) suggests that Joel Gott and Charles Bieler are the vintners here for the 2018 Chronicle. Thanks gents for your contribution to a great evening. I enjoyed your wine and will buy more in the future, but what I’m really excited to repeat is the Beef Bourguignon.

2017 Cabernet Sauvignon, Justin

I’m fairly certain that I had a Justin many years ago, a Reserve or similar high-end split courtesy of my brother George, and that memory sparked my purchase of this 2017 for the holiday weekend. Those memories may be suspect, however, as I do a search and see no results returned. Regardless, the vineyard’s 2017 Cabernet Sauvignon is here for your consumption.

2017 Cabernet Sauvignon, Justin, Paso Robles, California, USA.

Winemaker Scott Shirley does nice work with the 2017, which commemorates 30 years of producing this Cabernet Sauvignon. It’s traditionally crafted, right from the hand-picking of the grapes from their limestone-soiled, Paso Robles vineyards to the hand-sorting and small oak barrel aging (for more than a year) of the fruit. This craftsmanship implies care, quality, and consistent berry quality as well.

In your glass it pours deeply, fragrant purple, with really nice cherry aromas. We taste it and think of earth notes and leather too, so there’s more than some of that in the 2017 vintage. The wine is full and has an excellent mouthfeel and a fresh finish. Loved the taste for the price point, and it went very well with our dinner of grilled (okay, and partly roasted too) chicken thighs, corn, and a delicious rice-black bean recipe that’s years in the making.

Here’s your notes from the winemaker: “Dry, nearly full bodied, with ripe black cherry, cassis and red fruit, baking spice and oak accents on entry with sustained ripe primary and mostly black fruit, dried autumn leaf, cocoa and a pleasant suggestion of camphor on the mid-palate into the finish.”

I purchased this bottle from a grocery I (unfortunately!) don’t often frequent so I’m not sure how often the Justin will make an appearance in Notes. I’ll look forward to the occasions that it does. Try one for yourself!

2017 Decoy Cabernet Sauvignon, Decoy Wines

The Decoy. Having had the complete pleasure of tasting the Duckhorn Cab flagship for my birthday (thanks bro), I pulled this  bottle from the shelf of my local grocery store when looking for options to start off the weekend. The Decoy is also a favorite of my best friend, for him a cellar defender that gets a lot of run. Now I know why.  

2017 Cabernet Sauvignon, Decoy
2017 Decoy Cabernet Sauvignon, Decoy Vines, Sonoma County, California, USA.

The wine is really nice, a plum-infused and blackberry treat. Definite dark fruits on the nose and on your palate! The 2017 is even and balanced, a medium red that has a simple finish. You’ll find yourself trying to access other tastes, other ways of describing what’s in store here in the 2017 Duckhorn, because it’s a Cabernet Sauvignon with subtleties that continue to occur to you as you make your way through the glass.

The 2017 Decoy Cabernet Sauvignon from Duckhorn Vineyards is produced in Sonoma County, one of my favorite AVAs on this little planet of ours. Cara and I had this one with roasted chicken, accented with lemon and garlic, as well as roasted sweet potato, carrots, and fennel. Oh yeah, with an arugula and onion salad too. The wine was well paired with our meal and enjoyed by us both.

Here’s a description from the winemaker: “Aromas of blackberry, boysenberry, cigar box, toffee, and mint lead to fresh dark berry and red currant flavors and dried herbs.”

All that comes from the blend, a mix of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Petite Sirah, Zinfandel, and others. It’s an enjoyable one and accessible from a price and value standpoint. Get a couple of these for yourself and we’ll compare notes. 

 

WA5, Locations Wine

This day started with a quest for martini fixings, but since all the local ABC stores are closed for the holiday, it’s wine time here. Yes I am a fan of all things Dave Phinney, and I thought the WA locations would be more than a great fill-in for the missing well drinks.

WA5, Locations Wine, Napa, California, USA.

Importantly, know this bottle fits all the beats of a Phinney wine. Ripe, layered, and kitchen-sink style in its blend overall. This one is blueberry, it is blackberry, and it is hints of merlot to be sure. I found it to be fruit-forward but not the flavor bomb that some of Dave’s creations can embody. I assert here it was the right bottle for the evening, one where I’m recuperating from weeks of overwork and singular focus on a particular outcome. 

The WA Locations 5 accompanied a green salad (complete with mushrooms, yellow onion, radishes, arugula, and cucumbers) and a kick-ass chili that was kicked up with the heat—cumin, chili powder, and all the accoutrements. A nice give and take between the grapes and the food!

2016 Juggernaut Hillside Cabernet Sauvignon, Juggernaut Wine Co.

This is the 2016 Juggernaut Hillside Cabernet and yes, for those of you asking, this guy can be swayed by cool branding. Check out this crazy fierce label! It’s as big as the wine itself, and you’ll do well to go looking for it in your favorite wine store / source.

Juggernaut

2016 Juggernaut Hillside Cabernet Sauvignon, Clarksburg, California, USA.

The Juggernaut is produced by the Bogle family, and you know they’ve been at this game for quite some time. My winestore source said they’ve been growing grapes for winemaking since 1968 and in the Clarksburg area in particular. Here they combine grapes from the North Coast, Livermore Valley, Alexander Valley, and the Sierra Foothills–all hillside terrior and vineyards going into this luscious bottle. Obviously with all the hillside talk you have this inference of “hard growing” and “extreme” (and hell, isn’t just about every vineyard photo you see on some kind of a mountain?!?) but know for our purposes it ultimately translates into really nice, easy-drinking California cab. Yes hillside can mean fewer grapes and smaller berries, but that also means concentrated flavors and complexity in the wine itself.

Not every hillside wine gets this right, but the Juggernaut does. There is big, dark blackberry-type flavors in the 2016, and maybe just a whiff of vanilla too. I suspect the new French oak barrels (its aged 12-18 months) have something to do with that. The 2016 Juggernaut (I have two more of these) is really nice value for the price. It’s accessible wine, both for your wallet and your palate. I enjoyed over a couple of nights and will look forward to the next such occasion. Thanks for following Notes and feel free to share with a friend.