2011 Chateau Close la Chapelle, Cotes de Bordeaux Cadillac Red Blend

“Cadillac Bordeaux” gives one a definite impression even before drinking, and these grapes do the moniker justice. We opened this bottle last evening with dinner (a delicious, cheesy enchilada with salty black beans riding shotgun), and polished it off tonight with our hors d’oeuvres–the perfect follow-up to a warm, Carolina afternoon filled with hiking and outdoor fun.

2011 Chateau Close la Chapelle, Cotes de Bordeaux Cadillac Red Blend, Bordeaux, France.

2011 Chateau Close la Chapelle, Cotes de Bordeaux Cadillac Red Blend, Bordeaux, France.

Even without a long breathing period this Cotes de Bordeaux Cadillac Red Blend was easy on the palate, a dark and rich mix of berries…with no harshness that you’d find in a Syrah or similar.  It has hints in it…hints that I can’t quite place but evidence of a richer heritage than my paltry experience can identify.  Suffice it to say, several refills later found me happy and healthy and wise.  Who hasn’t been to this place?

Here’s how the experts called it: “This soft, plush cuvee offers notes of black cherry, peat moss, blackberry, cassis, toast, vanilla, cedar, and coconut.

Overstated, to be sure, but not too far off the mark.  Those same experts said to drink the 2011 Chateau Close la Chapelle, Cotes de Bordeaux Cadillac Red Blend with grilled pork and rosemary.  Sounds smart, but my wife’s experiment with the enchilada was solid too.  The Cadillac Bordeaux is a rich tapestry, and you’ve got to give this one a try.  It’s a mix of Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Cabernet Franc that is aged in stainless steel and French Oak barrels for about a year.  We received the bottle as part of a mail order so can’t quite ante up again ourselves–but we would if we could.

One thought on “2011 Chateau Close la Chapelle, Cotes de Bordeaux Cadillac Red Blend

  1. […] an interesting fact in particular because the Castle Rock followed immediately on the heels of a Bordeaux that earned some praise in Notes — but what a contrast between the […]

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